.

.

Day

 

Objectives

 

Task Warm Up Guiding Questions /

Additional Info

Wrap Up/

Exit Ticket

MON

5/23

7.RP.A.2 Recognize and represent proportional relationships between quantities.

c. Represent proportional relationships by equations.  For example, if total cost  is proportional to the number  of items purchased at a constant price, the relationship between the total cost and the number of items can be expressed as .

7.RP.A.3 Use proportional relationships to solve multistep ratio and percent problems. Examples:  simple interest, tax, markups and markdowns, gratuities and commissions, fees, percent increase and decrease, percent error.

Module 4 Lesson 2

Part of a Whole as  a Percent

Fluency Routine In Topic A, students build on their conceptual understanding of percent from Grade 6.  They realize that a percent can be greater than  or less than .  They also realize that a percent can be a non-whole number such as , part of a complex fraction such as , or a simplified but equivalent fraction such as  .  They know  to be the whole and also equal to one.  They use this conceptualization along with their previous understanding of ratios and proportional relationships from Module 1 to solve percent problems (7.RP.A.2c, 7.RP.A.3).  In Lesson 1, students revisit the meaning of the word percent and convert between fractions, decimals, and percents with a Sprint at the beginning of the lesson.  As the lesson progresses, students use complex fractions to represent non-whole number percents; they also recognize that any percent greater than  is a number greater than one, and any percent less than  is a number less than one-hundredth.  Students realize that, for instance,  means  for every , which equals , or , for every  (7.RP.A.1). HW Due Wednesday

Page 93

TUES

5/24

 

 Module 4 Lesson 2

Part of a Whole as  a Percent Practice

Fluency Routine
WED

5/25

 

Module 4 Lesson 3

Comparing Quantities with Percent

Fluency Routine HW Due Friday

Problem Set 3 Summary and Page 95

THU

5/26

Module 4 Lesson 4

Percent Increase and Decrease

Fluency Routine
FRI

5/27

 

Percent Increase and Percent Decrease Practice HW CHECKUP

..

.

Day

 

Objectives

 

Task Warm Up Guiding Questions /

Additional Info

Wrap Up/

Exit Ticket

MON

5/16

7.G.B.4 Know the formulas for the area and circumference of a circle and use them to solve problems; give an informal derivation of the relationship between the circumference and area of a circle.

7.G.B.6 Solve real-world and mathematical problems involving area, volume and surface area of two- and three-dimensional objects composed of triangles, quadrilaterals, polygons, cubes, and right prisms.

Kahoots to review the year

 

page 42 & 44 In Topic A, students build on their conceptual understanding of percent from Grade 6.  They realize that a percent can be greater than  or less than .  They also realize that a percent can be a non-whole number such as , part of a complex fraction such as , or a simplified but equivalent fraction such as  .  They know  to be the whole and also equal to one.  They use this conceptualization along with their previous understanding of ratios and proportional relationships from Module 1 to solve percent problems (7.RP.A.2c, 7.RP.A.3).  In Lesson 1, students revisit the meaning of the word percent and convert between fractions, decimals, and percents with a Sprint at the beginning of the lesson.  As the lesson progresses, students use complex fractions to represent non-whole number percents; they also recognize that any percent greater than  is a number greater than one, and any percent less than  is a number less than one-hundredth.  Students realize that, for instance,  means  for every , which equals , or , for every  (7.RP.A.1). HW Due Thursday

Pages 92/94

Percents Equivalencies and Percent Equations

TUES

5/17

MSTEP No 1st Hour

MSTEP

No 1st Hour

None
WED

5/18

MSTEP No 1st Hour

MSTEP

No 1st Hour

None No New HW

MSTEP

THU

5/19

Fracadent – Homework Check
FRI

5/20

 

Movie –

MSTEP Incentive

None

.

Day

 

Objectives

 

Task Warm Up Guiding Questions /

Additional Info

Wrap Up/

Exit Ticket

MON

5/9

7.G.B.4 Know the formulas for the area and circumference of a circle and use them to solve problems; give an informal derivation of the relationship between the circumference and area of a circle.

7.G.B.6 Solve real-world and mathematical problems involving area, volume and surface area of two- and three-dimensional objects composed of triangles, quadrilaterals, polygons, cubes, and right prisms.

Volume and Surface Area of Prisms Practice Lesson 25 extra problems

 

Math Minute 4 This topic concludes as students apply their knowledge of plane figures to find the surface area and volume of three-dimensional figures.  In Lessons 23 and 24, students will recognize the volume of a right prism to be the area of the base times the height and compute volumes of right prisms involving fractional values for length (7.G.B.6).  In the last two lessons, students solidify their understanding of two- and three-dimensional objects as they solve real-world and mathematical problems involving area, volume, and surface area.

 

HW Due Thursday

Solving Equations and Inequalities

TUES

5/10

MSTEP

No 1st Hour

MSTEP

No 1st Hour

Math Minute 5
WED

5/11

MSTEP

No 1st Hour

MSTEP

No 1st Hour

Math Minute 6 Now New HW (MSTEP)
THU

5/12

Volume of Prisms Practice Math Minute 7
FRI

5/13

 

Performance Task Review
Day

 

Objectives

 

Task Warm Up Guiding Questions /

Additional Info

Wrap Up/

Exit Ticket

MON

5/2

 

7.G.B.4 Know the formulas for the area and circumference of a circle and use them to solve problems; give an informal derivation of the relationship between the circumference and area of a circle.

7.G.B.6 Solve real-world and mathematical problems involving area, volume and surface area of two- and three-dimensional objects composed of triangles, quadrilaterals, polygons, cubes, and right prisms.

Module 3 Lesson 23

 

Math Minute 4 This topic concludes as students apply their knowledge of plane figures to find the surface area and volume of three-dimensional figures.  In Lessons 23 and 24, students will recognize the volume of a right prism to be the area of the base times the height and compute volumes of right prisms involving fractional values for length (7.G.B.6).  In the last two lessons, students solidify their understanding of two- and three-dimensional objects as they solve real-world and mathematical problems involving area, volume, and surface area.

 

HW Due Wednesday

 

TUES

5/3

 

Module 4 Lesson 24

 

Math Minute 5 Compare the capacity of two tanks
WED

5/4

 

Module 3 Lesson 25

 

Math Minute 6 HW Due Friday Problem Set 25 #1-2
THU

5/5

Performance Task Review Math Minute 7
FRI

5/6

 

Volume and Surface Area of a Cell Project

 

..

Day

 

Objectives

 

Task Warm Up Guiding Questions /

Additional Info

Wrap Up/

Exit Ticket

MON

4/25

 

7.G.B.4 Know the formulas for the area and circumference of a circle and use them to solve problems; give an informal derivation of the relationship between the circumference and area of a circle.

7.G.B.6 Solve real-world and mathematical problems involving area, volume and surface area of two- and three-dimensional objects composed of triangles, quadrilaterals, polygons, cubes, and right prisms.

Module 3 Lesson 17

Circumference and Area of Circles

Math Minute 1 Page 191 introduces students to situations that are modeled in the form  and . Students then find the number(s) that make each inequality true.  To better understand how to solve an inequality containing a variable, students look at statements comparing numbers in Lesson 13.  They discover when (and why) multiplying by a negative number reverses the inequality symbol when this symbol is preserved.  In Lesson 14, students extend the idea of isolating the variable in an equation to solve problems modeled with inequalities using the properties of inequality.  This topic concludes with students modeling inequality solutions on a number line and interpreting what each solution means within the context of the problem (7.EE.B.4b).

 

HW Due Wednesday

Lesson 17 Summary and extra practice

TUES

4/26

MSTEP

 

Module 4 Lesson 18 Circumference, Area, and Composite Figures Math Minute 2 Problem Set Questions 1-3
WED

4/27

Module 3 Lesson 19

Area Problems on the Coordinate Plane

Math Minute 3 HW Due Friday

Lesson 19 and Lesson 20

Problem Sets

THU

4/28

Module 3 Lesson 20

Composite Area

Math Minute 4 Problem Set Questions 1-2
FRI

4/29

 

Module 3 Part C Quiz – Finding Area of Composite Figures and Figures on a Coordinate Grid Find area of these three shapes (triangle, parallelogram, quarter circle) QUIZ

..

..

Day

 

Objectives

 

Task Warm Up Guiding Questions /

Additional Info

Wrap Up/

Exit Ticket

MON

4/18

 

7.EE.B.4 Use variables to represent quantities in a real-world or mathematical problem, and construct simple equations and inequalities to solve problems by reasoning about the quantities.

a) Solve word problems leading to equations of the form  and , where , , and  are specific rational numbers.  Solve equations of these forms fluently.  Compare an algebraic solution to an arithmetic solution, identifying the sequence of the operations used in each approach.  For example, the perimeter of a rectangle is  cm. Its length is  cm.  What is its width?

b)  Solve word problems leading to inequalities of the form  or , where , , and  are specific rational numbers.  Graph the solution set of the inequality and interpret it in the context of the problem.  For example:  As a salesperson, you are paid  per week plus  per sale.  This week you want your pay to be at least .  Write an inequality for the number of sales you need to make, and describe the solutions.

Solving Two Step Inequalities

Double Bubble Map and start page 191

Math Crush Inequality Fluency Practice + Khan Academy Video Page 191 introduces students to situations that are modeled in the form  and . Students then find the number(s) that make each inequality true.  To better understand how to solve an inequality containing a variable, students look at statements comparing numbers in Lesson 13.  They discover when (and why) multiplying by a negative number reverses the inequality symbol when this symbol is preserved.  In Lesson 14, students extend the idea of isolating the variable in an equation to solve problems modeled with inequalities using the properties of inequality.  This topic concludes with students modeling inequality solutions on a number line and interpreting what each solution means within the context of the problem (7.EE.B.4b).

 

HW Due Wednesday

Finish Page 191 and

Lesson 13 Summary

TUES

4/19

Module 3 Lesson 13 Writing Inequalities in Real Context Problems 1-3 Problem in Context – waiter earning tips
WED

4/20

Module 3 Lesson 14

Solving Inequalities

Match the solutions to the inequalities given HW Due Friday

Lesson 14 + 15  Summary

THU

4/21

Module 3 Lesson 15

Graphing Solutions to Inequalities

Write the inequality for the graphs given below Use time to review HW
FRI

4/22

 

Module 3 Mid Module Assessment No Warm Up QUIZ

.

Day

 

Objectives

 

Task Warm Up Guiding Questions /

Additional Info

Wrap Up/

Exit Ticket

MON

4/11

 

7.EE.B.4 Use variables to represent quantities in a real-world or mathematical problem, and construct simple equations and inequalities to solve problems by reasoning about the quantities.

a) Solve word problems leading to equations of the form  and , where , , and  are specific rational numbers.  Solve equations of these forms fluently.  Compare an algebraic solution to an arithmetic solution, identifying the sequence of the operations used in each approach.  For example, the perimeter of a rectangle is  cm. Its length is  cm.  What is its width?

b)  Solve word problems leading to inequalities of the form  or , where , , and  are specific rational numbers.  Graph the solution set of the inequality and interpret it in the context of the problem.  For example:  As a salesperson, you are paid  per week plus  per sale.  This week you want your pay to be at least .  Write an inequality for the number of sales you need to make, and describe the solutions.

Review of ANGLE Vocabulary and Module 3 Lesson 10  Angle Problems and Solving Equations Use Math Dictionary for Kids to find the following definitions

Complementary, Supplementary, Adjacent, Vertical, Right, Straight

 

In Topic B, students use linear equations and inequalities to solve problems (7.EE.B.4).  They continue to use tape diagrams from earlier grades where they see fit, but will quickly discover that some problems would more reasonably be solved algebraically (as in the case of large numbers).  Guiding students to arrive at this realization on their own develops the need for algebra.  This algebraic approach builds upon work in Grade 6 with equations (6.EE.B.6, 6.EE.B.7) to now include multi-step equations and inequalities containing rational numbers (7.EE.B.3, 7.EE.B.4).  Students solve problems involving consecutive numbers; total cost; age comparisons; distance, rate, and time; area and perimeter; and missing angle measures.  Solving equations with a variable is all about numbers, and students are challenged with the goal of finding the number that makes the equation true.  When given in context, students recognize that a value exists, and it is simply their job to discover what that value is.  Even the angles in each diagram have a precise value, which can be checked with a protractor to ensure students that the value they find does indeed create a true number sentence. HW Due Wednesday

Lesson 10 Summary and Page D30

TUES

4/12

Module 3 Lesson 11 Angle Problems and Solving Equations Page D31 Find the measure of HAJ
WED

4/13

Review of Inequality Statements Fluency Routine – Inequalities Statements Exit Ticket – Graph two inequalities and write one

HW Due Friday

Page 189

THU

4/14

Module 3 Lesson 12

Inequalities

Fluency Routine Inequalities with Integers Summarize the Stations by identifying similarities and differences
FRI

4/15

 

Module 3 Lesson 13 Writing Inequalities in Real Context Problem Set 12 #1-3 Exercises 1-2

..

Day

 

Objectives

 

Task Warm Up Guiding Questions /

Additional Info

Wrap Up/

Exit Ticket

MON

3/28

 

7.EE.B.4 Use variables to represent quantities in a real-world or mathematical problem, and construct simple equations and inequalities to solve problems by reasoning about the quantities.

a) Solve word problems leading to equations of the form 16px+q=r’>  and 16p(x+q)=r’> , where 16p’> , 16q’> , and 16r’>  are specific rational numbers.  Solve equations of these forms fluently.  Compare an algebraic solution to an arithmetic solution, identifying the sequence of the operations used in each approach.  For example, the perimeter of a rectangle is 1654′>  cm. Its length is 166′>  cm.  What is its width?

b)  Solve word problems leading to inequalities of the form 16px+q>r’>  or 16px+q<r’> , where 16p’> , 16q’> , and 16r’>  are specific rational numbers.  Graph the solution set of the inequality and interpret it in the context of the problem.  For example:  As a salesperson, you are paid 16$50′>  per week plus 16$3′>  per sale.  This week you want your pay to be at least 16$100′> .  Write an inequality for the number of sales you need to make, and describe the solutions.

Module 3 Lesson 8

Using If-Then Moves in Solving Equations

Create a Flow Map and write a two/three sentence explanation using vocabulary words. In Topic B, students use linear equations and inequalities to solve problems (7.EE.B.4).  They continue to use tape diagrams from earlier grades where they see fit, but will quickly discover that some problems would more reasonably be solved algebraically (as in the case of large numbers).  Guiding students to arrive at this realization on their own develops the need for algebra.  This algebraic approach builds upon work in Grade 6 with equations (6.EE.B.6, 6.EE.B.7) to now include multi-step equations and inequalities containing rational numbers (7.EE.B.3, 7.EE.B.4).  Students solve problems involving consecutive numbers; total cost; age comparisons; distance, rate, and time; area and perimeter; and missing angle measures.  Solving equations with a variable is all about numbers, and students are challenged with the goal of finding the number that makes the equation true.  When given in context, students recognize that a value exists, and it is simply their job to discover what that value is.  Even the angles in each diagram have a precise value, which can be checked with a protractor to ensure students that the value they find does indeed create a true number sentence. HW Due Thursday

Lesson 8 Summary and Page 46

 

TUES

3/29

Module 3 Lesson 9

Using If-Then Moves in Solving Equations

Generate an equation from the real world scenario. Lesson 9 Exit Ticket
WED

3/30

Module 3 Lesson 9 Using If-Then Moves in Solving Equations Generate a D=rt equation from the real world scenario. No New Homework

 

THU

3/31

INSIGHT Practice What are you confident about? What are you worried about? Do you know if you were proficient or not last year? What will be the most difficult part of the MStep this year?

What will you do to prepare for the MStep between now and then?

FRI

4/1

1/2 Day

 NO STUDENTS NO STUDENTS NO STUDENTS

 

..

Day

 

Objectives

 

Task Warm Up Guiding Questions /

Additional Info

Wrap Up/

Exit Ticket

MON

3/21

 

7.EE.A.1 Apply properties of operations as strategies to add, subtract, factor, and expand linear expressions with rational coefficients.

7.EE.A.2 Understand that rewriting an expression in different forms in a problem context can shed light on the problem and how the quantities in it are related.  For example,  means that “increase by ” is the same as “multiply by .”

Solving Equations using Manipulatives to Scaffold Double Bubble Map

Compare 2x + 5 = 25 to

2x+4 = 3x + 2

To begin this module, students will generate equivalent expressions using the fact that addition and multiplication can be done in any order with any grouping and will extend this understanding to subtraction (adding the inverse) and division (multiplying by the multiplicative inverse, also known as the reciprocal) (7.EE.A.1).  They extend the properties of operations with numbers (learned in earlier grades) and recognize how the same properties hold true for letters that represent numbers.  Knowledge of rational number operations from Module 2 is demonstrated as students collect like terms containing both positive and negative integers.

 

HW Due Wednesday

Page 52

TUES

3/22

STAR TESTING Identify and explain the top three reasons why every student should give the best reasonable effort on the STAR test today. NONE
WED

3/23

Solving Equations Dominoes Fluency Practice HW Due Thursday – Unit Rates Review page 85

 

THU

3/24

INSIGHT Practice Fluency Practice What will be the most difficult part of the MStep this year?

What will you do to prepare for the MStep between now and then ?

FRI

3/25

 NO STUDENTS NO STUDENTS NO STUDENTS

….

Day

 

Objectives

 

Task Warm Up Guiding Questions /

Additional Info

Wrap Up/

Exit Ticket

MON

3/14

 

7.EE.A.1 Apply properties of operations as strategies to add, subtract, factor, and expand linear expressions with rational coefficients.

7.EE.A.2 Understand that rewriting an expression in different forms in a problem context can shed light on the problem and how the quantities in it are related.  For example,  means that “increase by ” is the same as “multiply by .”

Solving Equations using Manipulatives to Scaffold Fluency Practice To begin this module, students will generate equivalent expressions using the fact that addition and multiplication can be done in any order with any grouping and will extend this understanding to subtraction (adding the inverse) and division (multiplying by the multiplicative inverse, also known as the reciprocal) (7.EE.A.1).  They extend the properties of operations with numbers (learned in earlier grades) and recognize how the same properties hold true for letters that represent numbers.  Knowledge of rational number operations from Module 2 is demonstrated as students collect like terms containing both positive and negative integers.

 

HW Due Wednesday

Page 206

 

TUES

315

Solving Equations using Manipulatives to Scaffold into Combining Like Terms Fluency Practice One question per set
WED

3/16

Solving Equations using Manipulatives to Scaffold into Distributive Property Two Equations – Combine Like Terms to Solve HW Due Friday

Page 50 Equations with Distributive Property

THU

3/17

Solving Equations using Manipulatives to Scaffold into Variables on Both Sides Review of two homework questions How is the additive inverse property used differently when the variable is on both sides of the equation?
FRI

3/18

Solving Equations with Variables on Both Sides

Page 212

Submit Class Work

.

 

Day

 

Objectives

 

Task Warm Up Guiding Questions /

Additional Info

Wrap Up/ Exit Ticket
MON

3/7

SUB

 

7.EE.A.1 Apply properties of operations as strategies to add, subtract, factor, and expand linear expressions with rational coefficients.

7.EE.A.2 Understand that rewriting an expression in different forms in a problem context can shed light on the problem and how the quantities in it are related.  For example,  means that “increase by ” is the same as “multiply by .”

Module 3 Lesson 4 Writing Sums as Products and Products as Sums Write in Standard Form.

Write in Factored Form.

To begin this module, students will generate equivalent expressions using the fact that addition and multiplication can be done in any order with any grouping and will extend this understanding to subtraction (adding the inverse) and division (multiplying by the multiplicative inverse, also known as the reciprocal) (7.EE.A.1).  They extend the properties of operations with numbers (learned in earlier grades) and recognize how the same properties hold true for letters that represent numbers.  Knowledge of rational number operations from Module 2 is demonstrated as students collect like terms containing both positive and negative integers.

 

HW Due Wednesday Page 7 Distributive Property and Combine Like Terms

 

TUES

3/8

In Class Practice with Distributive Property page 24 Fluency Routine Submit Practice Page
WED

3/9

Module 3 Lesson 5 Identity and Inverse Properties

(Addition)

Define

Additive Identity

Inverse

HW Due Friday

Page 28 & 31 Solving Equations using the Inverse Properties

THU

3/10

Module 3 Lesson 5 Identity and Inverse Properties Continued

(Multiplication)

Define

Multiplicative Identity

Reciprocal

Name the property?
How does this help you to solve equations?
FRI

3/11

Module 3 Lesson 5 Identity and Inverse Properties Continued

(Connecting to Solving Equations)

What does the additive inverse help you to accomplish?

What does the multiplicative inverse help you to accomplish?

Submit Problem Set

..

Day

 

Objectives

 

Task Warm Up Guiding Questions /

Additional Info

Wrap Up/ Exit Ticket
MON

2/29

 

7.EE.A.1 Apply properties of operations as strategies to add, subtract, factor, and expand linear expressions with rational coefficients.

7.EE.A.2 Understand that rewriting an expression in different forms in a problem context can shed light on the problem and how the quantities in it are related.  For example,  means that “increase by ” is the same as “multiply by .”

No School No School To begin this module, students will generate equivalent expressions using the fact that addition and multiplication can be done in any order with any grouping and will extend this understanding to subtraction (adding the inverse) and division (multiplying by the multiplicative inverse, also known as the reciprocal) (7.EE.A.1).  They extend the properties of operations with numbers (learned in earlier grades) and recognize how the same properties hold true for letters that represent numbers.  Knowledge of rational number operations from Module 2 is demonstrated as students collect like terms containing both positive and negative integers.

 

No School
TUES

3/1

Module 3 Lesson 2

Writing Expressions in Standard Form and Evaluating the Value

Determine whether or not the two expressions are equal – Justify HW Due Thursday page 34

Combining Like Terms and Evaluating Expressions

 

WED

3/2

Module 3 Lesson 2 Continued

Writing Expressions in Standard Form and Evaluating the Value

Fluency Routine
THU

3/3

Module 3 Lesson 3 Rewriting Expressions in Standard Form using the Distributive Property Mini Web Quest – What is distributive property? HW Due Monday

Page 6 Distributive property

FRI

3/4

Module 3 Lesson 3 Continued Rewriting Expressions in Standard Form using the Distributive Property Write two equivalent expressions for the array shown.

..

.

Day

 

Objectives

 

Task Warm Up Guiding Questions /

Additional Info

Wrap Up/ Exit Ticket
MON

2/22

 

7.EE.A.1 Apply properties of operations as strategies to add, subtract, factor, and expand linear expressions with rational coefficients.

7.EE.A.2 Understand that rewriting an expression in different forms in a problem context can shed light on the problem and how the quantities in it are related.  For example,  means that “increase by ” is the same as “multiply by .”

Introduction to Module 3

Vocabulary, concept map, etc.

Notebook Organization To begin this module, students will generate equivalent expressions using the fact that addition and multiplication can be done in any order with any grouping and will extend this understanding to subtraction (adding the inverse) and division (multiplying by the multiplicative inverse, also known as the reciprocal) (7.EE.A.1).  They extend the properties of operations with numbers (learned in earlier grades) and recognize how the same properties hold true for letters that represent numbers.  Knowledge of rational number operations from Module 2 is demonstrated as students collect like terms containing both positive and negative integers.

 

HW Due Wednesday

 

TUES

2/23

Lesson 1 Combining Like Terms Fluency practice – adding/subtracting integers
WED

2/24

SUB

Combining Like Terms / Simplifying Expressions Activity No New Homework,

Sub Work due Thursday

 

THU

2/25

Combining Like Terms and Simplifying Expressions practice page Prove whether or not the expressions given are equal If page 34 is not completed, it will be due upon return from the long weekend
FRI

2/26

No School No School No School

.

Day

 

Objectives

 

Task Warm Up Guiding Questions /

Additional Info

Wrap Up/ Exit Ticket
MON

2/15

 

7.NS.A.2 Apply and extend previous understandings of multiplication and division of fractions to multiply and divide rational numbers.  a) Understand that multiplication is extended from fractions to rational numbers by requiring that operations continue to satisfy the properties of operations, particularly the distributive property, leading to products such as (-1)(-1) = 1 and the rules for multiplying signed numbers.  Interpret products of rational numbers by describing real world contexts.  b) Understand that integers can be divided, provided that the divisor is not zero, and every quotient of integers (with non-zero divisor) is a rational number.  If p and q are integers, then –(p/q) = (-p)/q = p/(-q).  Interpret quotients of rational numbers by describing real world contexts.  c) Apply properties of operations as strategies to multiply and divide rational numbers. d) Convert a rational number to a decimal using long division; know that the decimal form of a rational number either terminates (ending in 0) or eventually repeats. Continue  Lesson 23 – Solving Equations Using Algebra in Real Context Number Sense Routines

Equation of the Day

In Lessons 18 and 19, students create and evaluate equivalent forms of expressions involving rational numbers to see structure, reveal characteristics, and make connections to context (7.EE.A.2).

Going into the final lesson of the unit, students will be reminded that expressions can be written for situations in which we know an equivalent value.  For instance:  If , then .  Topic C concludes with a two-day lesson.  In Lessons 22 and 23, students work towards fluently solving word problems through the use of equations (7.EE.B.4a).  Using algebra to deconstruct and solve contextual problems continues as the focus in Module 3.

 

HW Due Wednesday

Lesson 23 Summary and E76

TUES

2/16

Always, Sometimes, Never

(Equality Statements)

Correcting Student Work – analyze Jackson’s mistakes Always Sometime Never Project
WED

2/17

Matching Equations to Real Context Circle all equations that apply to the real context situation HW Due Friday

Page 44

THU

2/18

Generating Equations from Real Context Generate and solve an equation
FRI

2/19

End of Module Assessment End of Mod Assessment

..

Day

 

Objectives

 

Task Warm Up Guiding Questions /

Additional Info

Wrap Up/ Exit Ticket
MON

2/8

 

7.NS.A.2 Apply and extend previous understandings of multiplication and division of fractions to multiply and divide rational numbers.  a) Understand that multiplication is extended from fractions to rational numbers by requiring that operations continue to satisfy the properties of operations, particularly the distributive property, leading to products such as (-1)(-1) = 1 and the rules for multiplying signed numbers.  Interpret products of rational numbers by describing real world contexts.  b) Understand that integers can be divided, provided that the divisor is not zero, and every quotient of integers (with non-zero divisor) is a rational number.  If p and q are integers, then –(p/q) = (-p)/q = p/(-q).  Interpret quotients of rational numbers by describing real world contexts.  c) Apply properties of operations as strategies to multiply and divide rational numbers. d) Convert a rational number to a decimal using long division; know that the decimal form of a rational number either terminates (ending in 0) or eventually repeats. Writing Equations to find a Missing Value in Real Context Explain the benefit(s) of simplifying expressions.

Generate an expression to represent discount & sale price

In Lessons 18 and 19, students create and evaluate equivalent forms of expressions involving rational numbers to see structure, reveal characteristics, and make connections to context (7.EE.A.2).

Going into the final lesson of the unit, students will be reminded that expressions can be written for situations in which we know an equivalent value.  For instance:  If , then .  Topic C concludes with a two-day lesson.  In Lessons 22 and 23, students work towards fluently solving word problems through the use of equations (7.EE.B.4a).  Using algebra to deconstruct and solve contextual problems continues as the focus in Module 3.

 

HW Due Wednesday

Page 18

TUES

2/9

Building Equations to Break them down – intro to solving complex equations Write an expression for Sally’s web expenses and solve to find her take home pay 4 equations to solve
WED

2/10

Lesson 22 – Solving Equations Using Algebra Determine which student’s equation for the cost of shirts is correct. HW Due Friday

Page 19

THU

2/11

Begin  Lesson 23 – Solving Equations Using Algebra Context Build to Break Down

Solve this equation 3(2x+5)=63

None- two day lesson
FRI

2/12

Continue  Lesson 23 – Solving Equations Using Algebra in Real Context Number Sense Routines

Equation of the Day

Generate and solve an equation to determine the cost of entering the math competition

..

Day

 

Objectives

 

Task Warm Up Guiding Questions /

Additional Info

Wrap Up/ Exit Ticket
MON

2/1

 

7.NS.A.2 Apply and extend previous understandings of multiplication and division of fractions to multiply and divide rational numbers.  a) Understand that multiplication is extended from fractions to rational numbers by requiring that operations continue to satisfy the properties of operations, particularly the distributive property, leading to products such as (-1)(-1) = 1 and the rules for multiplying signed numbers.  Interpret products of rational numbers by describing real world contexts.  b) Understand that integers can be divided, provided that the divisor is not zero, and every quotient of integers (with non-zero divisor) is a rational number.  If p and q are integers, then –(p/q) = (-p)/q = p/(-q).  Interpret quotients of rational numbers by describing real world contexts.  c) Apply properties of operations as strategies to multiply and divide rational numbers. d) Convert a rational number to a decimal using long division; know that the decimal form of a rational number either terminates (ending in 0) or eventually repeats. Finish Rational Number Mixed Operations Posters -9 x 22.6

15(4 1/3) + -25(3/5)

 

In Lessons 18 and 19, students create and evaluate equivalent forms of expressions involving rational numbers to see structure, reveal characteristics, and make connections to context (7.EE.A.2). HW Due Wednesday

Lesson 18 Summary and Page 36

 

TUES

2/2

Module 2 Lesson 18 –

Writing, Evaluating, and Finding Equivalent Expressions

Find 3x – 2y Generate an expression to represent the relationship between security deposit and damages.
WED

2/3

 Simplifying & Rewriting Expressions What’s another way to write this expression to make it easier? .5(50 + 12x) HW Due Friday

Page 35 Simplifying Expressions

THU

2/4

HALF DAY AM

Simplifying & Rewriting Expressions

 

What’s another way to write this expression to make it easier?

10x + 14 + -2x + 3 – 5x

Write two and evaluate two equivalent expressions that you would use to determine the final price of an item that is originally $75, marked 15% off, and taxed 7%.
FRI

2/5

Module 2 Lesson 19 –

Writing, Evaluating, and Finding Equivalent Expressions with Rational Numbers

Generate an expression to represent a family’s bill at a restaurant. Submit practice page.

 

Day

 

Objectives

 

Task Warm Up Guiding Questions /

Additional Info

Wrap Up/ Exit Ticket
MON

1/25

 

7.NS.A.2 Apply and extend previous understandings of multiplication and division of fractions to multiply and divide rational numbers.  a) Understand that multiplication is extended from fractions to rational numbers by requiring that operations continue to satisfy the properties of operations, particularly the distributive property, leading to products such as (-1)(-1) = 1 and the rules for multiplying signed numbers.  Interpret products of rational numbers by describing real world contexts.  b) Understand that integers can be divided, provided that the divisor is not zero, and every quotient of integers (with non-zero divisor) is a rational number.  If p and q are integers, then –(p/q) = (-p)/q = p/(-q).  Interpret quotients of rational numbers by describing real world contexts.  c) Apply properties of operations as strategies to multiply and divide rational numbers. d) Convert a rational number to a decimal using long division; know that the decimal form of a rational number either terminates (ending in 0) or eventually repeats. Module 2 Lesson 15 – Multiplication and Division of Rational Numbers Number Sense Routine In Lesson 15, students create numerical expressions with rational numbers based on the context of word problems.  In Lesson 16, properties of operations are used to rewrite expressions in equivalent forms as students multiply and divide rational numbers efficiently without the aid of a calculator (7.NS.A.2c).

 

HW Due Wednesday

Lesson 14 and Lesson 15 Summary

TUES

1/26

Module 2 Lesson 16 – Applying Mathematical Properties to Multiply and Divide Rational Numbers Number Sense Routine Question 6 from Lesson 16
WED

1/27

Finish Module 2 Lesson 16 and begin Properties of Math with Rational Numbers Puzzle Fluency Practice HW Due Friday

Lesson 16 Summary

THU

1/28

SUB

finish Properties of Math with Rational Numbers Puzzle –

SUB

12(-2 1/3) + -18(1 1/2) – 3(-2.5) Submit Puzzle to be graded
FRI

1/29

No Class No Class No Class

.

.

Day

 

Objectives

 

Task Warm Up Guiding Questions /

Additional Info

Wrap Up/ Exit Ticket
MON

1/18

 

7.NS.A.2 Apply and extend previous understandings of multiplication and division of fractions to multiply and divide rational numbers.  a) Understand that multiplication is extended from fractions to rational numbers by requiring that operations continue to satisfy the properties of operations, particularly the distributive property, leading to products such as (-1)(-1) = 1 and the rules for multiplying signed numbers.  Interpret products of rational numbers by describing real world contexts.  b) Understand that integers can be divided, provided that the divisor is not zero, and every quotient of integers (with non-zero divisor) is a rational number.  If p and q are integers, then –(p/q) = (-p)/q = p/(-q).  Interpret quotients of rational numbers by describing real world contexts.  c) Apply properties of operations as strategies to multiply and divide rational numbers. d) Convert a rational number to a decimal using long division; know that the decimal form of a rational number either terminates (ending in 0) or eventually repeats. Decimal Place Value

Review Activity – Comparing and Ordering Decimals

Compare Decimals In Lesson 13, students realize that the context of a word problem often determines whether the answer should be expressed in the fractional or decimal form of a rational number.  They draw upon their previous understanding of equivalent fractions, place value, and powers of ten to convert fractions whose denominators are a product of s and s into decimals.  In Lesson 14, students use long division to convert any fraction into a decimal that either terminates in zeros or repeats (7.NS.A.2d).  Products and quotients continue to be related to the real world.  In Lesson 15, students create numerical expressions with rational numbers based on the context of word problems.  In Lesson 16, properties of operations are used to rewrite expressions in equivalent forms as students multiply and divide rational numbers efficiently without the aid of a calculator (7.NS.A.2c).

 

HW Due Wednesday

B23 Comparing and Ordering Decimal Numbers

TUES

1/19

STAR Testing STAR Testing STAR Testing
WED

1/20

Decimal Place Value

Review Activity – Rounding Decimals

Illustrate and mark fractions to understand the value of a decimal HW Due Friday

B25 Rounding Decimal Numbers

THU

1/21

Module 2 Lesson 13 – Converting Between Fractions and Decimals Using Equivalent Fractions Collaboration Space – Fractions and Decimals in Real Life 2 Fraction – Decimal Conversions
FRI

1/22

Module 2 Lesson 14 – Converting Rational Numbers to Decimals Using Long Division Rational Number of the Day Fraction – Decimal Conversions

 

Explain which conversion is not like the others

 

HW if not completed.  Due Monday

.

Day

 

Objectives

 

Task Warm Up Guiding Questions /

Additional Info

Wrap Up/ Exit Ticket
MON

1/11

 

7.NS.A.2 Apply and extend previous understandings of multiplication and division of fractions to multiply and divide rational numbers.  a) Understand that multiplication is extended from fractions to rational numbers by requiring that operations continue to satisfy the properties of operations, particularly the distributive property, leading to products such as (-1)(-1) = 1 and the rules for multiplying signed numbers.  Interpret products of rational numbers by describing real world contexts.  b) Understand that integers can be divided, provided that the divisor is not zero, and every quotient of integers (with non-zero divisor) is a rational number.  If p and q are integers, then –(p/q) = (-p)/q = p/(-q).  Interpret quotients of rational numbers by describing real world contexts.  c) Apply properties of operations as strategies to multiply and divide rational numbers. d) Convert a rational number to a decimal using long division; know that the decimal form of a rational number either terminates (ending in 0) or eventually repeats. Simplifying Numeric Expressions using the Order of Operations – Fluency Warm Up Following the order of operations to simplify numeric expressions HW Due Wednesday

Page E64

TUES

1/12

Revise John Collins T3W  – Introduce Algebraic Expressions Fluency Warm Up Writing about the PROCESS – – Following the order of operations to simplify numeric expressions ab + cd

c + ad – b

 

WED

1/13

Simplifying Algebraic Expressions using the Order of Operations Fluency Warm Up Practice reading, comparing, ordering decimals to begin Module 2 – Part B Conversions HW Due Friday

Page 35

 

THU

1/14

Socrative Quiz –  Simplifying Expressions

Begin Module 2 Part B

Familiarization with Decimals (Review Activity)

John Collins T2W Connecting fractional form to decimal form Quiz
FRI

1/15

Module 2 Lesson 13

 

Connecting

Fraction–> Decimal &

Decimal–> Fraction Conversions

Write the names for the decimals given below in words. Connecting fractional form to decimal form None

.

Day

 

Objectives

 

Task Warm Up Guiding Questions /

Additional Info

Wrap Up/ Exit Ticket
MON

1/4

 

7.NS.A.2 Apply and extend previous understandings of multiplication and division of fractions to multiply and divide rational numbers.  a) Understand that multiplication is extended from fractions to rational numbers by requiring that operations continue to satisfy the properties of operations, particularly the distributive property, leading to products such as (-1)(-1) = 1 and the rules for multiplying signed numbers.  Interpret products of rational numbers by describing real world contexts.  b) Understand that integers can be divided, provided that the divisor is not zero, and every quotient of integers (with non-zero divisor) is a rational number.  If p and q are integers, then –(p/q) = (-p)/q = p/(-q).  Interpret quotients of rational numbers by describing real world contexts.  c) Apply properties of operations as strategies to multiply and divide rational numbers. d) Convert a rational number to a decimal using long division; know that the decimal form of a rational number either terminates (ending in 0) or eventually repeats. Module 2 Lesson 10

Introducing Multiplication of Integers

Warm Up

Find the sum of each problem given:

-5 + -5 + -5 + -5

-12 + -12 + -12

-50 + -50 + -50 + -50 + -50

How can you complete these problems without addition?

using Algeblocks to model multiplication problems – looking for patterns HW Due Wednesday

Lesson 11 Summary + Page E63

TUES

1/5

Module 2 Lesson 11 Developing Rules for Multiplying Signed Numbers 3 sets of integer war Building on the use of Algeblocks to summarize and extend the rules developed for integer multiplication If wo factors have a NEGATIVE PRODUCT, what must be true of the two factors? If two factors have a POSITIVE PRODUCT, what must be true of the two factors?
WED

1/6

Module 2 Lesson 12 Developing Rules for Dividing Integers Fluency Warm Up Using and extended previous knowledge and patterns: “Fact Families” will help students better understand the rules for integer division. HW Due Friday

Lesson 12 Summary + page E65

THU

1/7

In Class Practice – Mixed Operations with Integers Fluency Warm Up Following the order of operations to simplify numeric expressions Develop two flow maps to explain the process for solving #23 and #24
FRI

1/8

Flow Map + Type 3 Writing -6 (-12÷3) + (-4/2) + 7 Writing about the PROCESS – – Following the order of operations to simplify numeric expressions John Collins T3W

.

Day

 

Objectives

 

Task Warm Up Guiding Questions /

Additional Info

Wrap Up/ Exit Ticket
MON

12/14

 

7.NS.A.1  I can apply and extend previous understandings of addition and subtraction to add and subtract rational numbers; represent addition and subtraction on a horizontal or vertical number line diagram.

7.NS.A.1 a.  I can describe situations in which opposite quantities combine to make 0. For example, a hydrogen atom has 0 charge because its two constituents are oppositely charged.

7.NS.A.1 b. I understand p + q as the number located a distance |q| from p, in the positive or negative direction depending on whether q is positive or negative.  Show that a number and its opposite have a sum of 0 (are additive inverses).  Interpret sums of rational numbers by describing real‐world contexts.

c. I understand subtraction of rational numbers as adding the additive inverse, p – q = p + (–q).  Show that the distance between two rational numbers on the number line is the absolute value of their difference, and apply this principle in real‐world contexts.

d. Apply properties of operations as strategies to add and subtract rational numbers.

 

Lesson 7 Addition and Subtraction of Rational Numbers Generate at least 5 ways to model this question:

Supposed you turned 13 today.  How old were you 3 ½ years ago.

Students will use models (number lines) to develop an understanding of the addition and subtraction with rational numbers.

 

HW Due Wednesday Lesson 7 Summary + Fluency Practice
TUES

12/15

Lesson 8 Applying Properties to Add and Subtract Rational Numbers At the beginning of the summer, the water level of a pond is 2 feet below its normal level.  After an unusually dry summer, the water level of the pond dropped another 11/3 feet. Use a number line diagram to model the pond’s current water level in relation to its normal water level. Students will continue to use models (number lines) to develop an understanding of the addition and subtraction with rational numbers.

Today they should begin summarizing the strategies and applying the properties of math.

Jessica’s friend lent her .   Later that day Jessica gave her friend back dollars.

Which rational number represents the overall change to the amount of money Jessica’s friend has?

 

WED

12/16

Lesson 9 Applying Properties to Add and Subtract Rational Numbers Analyzing the Exit Ticket Jessica’s friend lent her .   Later that day Jessica gave her friend back dollars.

Which rational number represents the overall change to the amount of money Jessica’s friend has?

 

Students will continue to use properties of math to complete addition and subtraction with rational numbers.

 

HW Due Friday Lesson 9 Summary + Fluency Practice
THU

12/17

SUB

SUB

Integer Addition and Subtraction Practice page 29

SUB

Read the instructions and begin working.

SUB

Work completion is still expected with the guest teacher as this topic will be covered on the assessment tomorrow.

SUB

None

FRI

12/18

Assessment- Part A

Addition and Subtraction of Rational Numbers

 No Warm Up Assessment

.

Day

 

Objectives

 

Task Warm Up Guiding Questions /

Additional Info

Wrap Up/ Exit Ticket
MON

12/7

 

7.NS.A.1  I can apply and extend previous understandings of addition and subtraction to add and subtract rational numbers; represent addition and subtraction on a horizontal or vertical number line diagram.

7.NS.A.1 a.  I can describe situations in which opposite quantities combine to make 0. For example, a hydrogen atom has 0 charge because its two constituents are oppositely charged.

7.NS.A.1 b. I understand p + q as the number located a distance |q| from p, in the positive or negative direction depending on whether q is positive or negative.  Show that a number and its opposite have a sum of 0 (are additive inverses).  Interpret sums of rational numbers by describing real‐world contexts.

c. I understand subtraction of rational numbers as adding the additive inverse, p – q = p + (–q).  Show that the distance between two rational numbers on the number line is the absolute value of their difference, and apply this principle in real‐world contexts.

d. Apply properties of operations as strategies to add and subtract rational numbers.

 

modified version of Integer War à

Modeling Integer Subtraction

– two-color chips

connecting what we knew to what we’re learning

Describe the two rules we developed to use when adding integers. Students will use models

– two-color chips and number lines –

to develop an understanding of the differences between addition with integers and subtraction with integers.

Students will use a variety of strategies while practicing – including integer war.  Extra credit is available to students who teach their parents how to play integer war, both addition and subtraction.  Parents, please send me a note if they do!

HW Lesson 5 Summary +E61

Due Wednesday

TUES

12/8

Modeling Integer Subtraction

– number lines

Double bubble map for 8-1 and 1-8 Using the rule of subtraction, rewrite the following subtraction expressions as addition expressions and find the sums.

a. 5−9 b. −14−2 c. -5 – (-3)

WED

12/9

Integer Addition and Subtraction – Practice Without Models

Dominoes Partner activity

 

Summarize the rules we developed for subtracting integers. Students will begin to move away from models and will practice subtraction without the use of a model.  Students may sketch models as necessary, but should begin to limit the need to do so. HW page E62
THU

12/10

Lesson 6 Distance Formula Use the number line to answer the following questions. Continue to practice without models now using a mixture of addition and subtraction, and set in a real context. Two 7th grade students, Monique and Matt, both solved the following math problem:  If the temperature drops from 7°F to −17°F, by how much did the temperature decrease? Monique said the answer is 24°F, and Matt said the answer is 10°F. Who is correct?  Explain, and support your written response with the use of a formula and a vertical number line diagram.
FRI

12/11

Lesson 7 Addition and Subtraction of Rational Numbers Generate at least 5 ways to model this question:

Supposed you turned 13 today.  How old were you 3 ½ years ago.

At the beginning of the summer, the water level of a pond is 2 feet below its normal level.  After an unusually dry summer, the water level of the pond dropped another 11/3 feet. Use a number line diagram to model the pond’s current water level in relation to its normal water level.

 

.

 

Day

 

Objectives

 

Task Warm Up Guiding Questions /

Additional Info

Wrap Up/ Exit Ticket
MON

11/30

 

7.NS.A.1  I can apply and extend previous understandings of addition and subtraction to add and subtract rational numbers; represent addition and subtraction on a horizontal or vertical number line diagram.

7.NS.A.1 a.  I can describe situations in which opposite quantities combine to make 0. For example, a hydrogen atom has 0 charge because its two constituents are oppositely charged.

7.NS.A.1 b. I understand p + q as the number located a distance |q| from p, in the positive or negative direction depending on whether q is positive or negative.  Show that a number and its opposite have a sum of 0 (are additive inverses).  Interpret sums of rational numbers by describing real‐world contexts.

c. I understand subtraction of rational numbers as adding the additive inverse, p – q = p + (–q).  Show that the distance between two rational numbers on the number line is the absolute value of their difference, and apply this principle in real‐world contexts.

d. Apply properties of operations as strategies to add and subtract rational numbers.

 

 Module 2 Lesson 3

Understanding Addition of Integers

Lesson 3 Homework Due Wednesday

Double Bubble Map

2 + 4 and 2 + -4

With models

Students have been successful with models, but need to begin to move away from models.  Before doing so, it is important for them to make some generalizations.  Lesson 3 Summary

Due Wednesday

TUES

12/1

Module 2 Lesson 4

Part A Efficiently Adding Integers and Other Rational Numbers

 

Double Bubble Map

5 + 8 and -5 + – 8

With models

 

Adding with same signs – keep the total and keep the sign -6 +- 6               -10 + -10

-7 + -7               -3 + -10

-100 + -30         -125 + -191

 

WED

12/2

Module 2 Lesson 4

Part B Efficiently Adding Integers and Other Rational Numbers

Lesson 4 Homework Due Friday

 Double Bubble Map

5 + -8 and -5 +  8

With models

 

Adding with different signs – is like subtraction, but the sign of the number with the bigger absolute value is the sign of the answer Lesson 4 Summary

+ Page E 58 Practice

Due Friday

THU

12/3

Integer Addition Partner Practice  and Kahoot Integer addition in real context story problems Practice without models None – Kahoot will give a summary of how students are doing and give them instant feedback
FRI

12/4

Mid Module Assessment

Lessons 1-4

No warm up – assessment Students who finish early can begin researching integer subtraction No exit ticket – assessment

.

.

Day Objectives Task Warm Up Guiding Questions /

Additional Info

Wrap Up/ Exit Ticket
MON

11/16

SUB

7.NS.A.1  I can apply and extend previous understandings of addition and subtraction to add and subtract rational numbers; represent addition and subtraction on a horizontal or vertical number line diagram.

7.NS.A.1 a.  I can describe situations in which opposite quantities combine to make 0. For example, a hydrogen atom has 0 charge because its two constituents are oppositely charged.

7.NS.A.1 b. I understand p + q as the number located a distance |q| from p, in the positive or negative direction depending on whether q is positive or negative.  Show that a number and its opposite have a sum of 0 (are additive inverses).  Interpret sums of rational numbers by describing real‐world contexts.

c. I understand subtraction of rational numbers as adding the additive inverse, p – q = p + (–q).  Show that the distance between two rational numbers on the number line is the absolute value of their difference, and apply this principle in real‐world contexts.

d. Apply properties of operations as strategies to add and subtract rational numbers.

Introduction to Module 2 – Operations with Rational Numbers

HW due Weds

Mixed Review Monday Elicit background knowledge— Circle map – integers

+ video – add to circle map, develop concept map for notebooks, begin vocabulary

https://www.youtube.com/

watch?v=NX3mNjSfERo

https://www.youtube.com/

watch?v=OAoLCXpao6s

pE55 / E56

# line / integer review homework

Due Wednesday

TUES

11/17

Review Sub Work

Introduce Integers – modeling addition using chips / score & chips / zero pairs

Type 1 Tuesday Use 3+ real life examples to explain the difference between positive and negative numbers

+ 4 images – add to circle map

Using the Algeblocks tiles as a visual model, students will try to combine +1 with -1 to create zero pairs.  This will help them to see that when adding positives and negatives, they can combine to create zero in the simplification process -6 + 6

-10 + 10

7 + -7

-3 + 10

-10 + -3

-12 + 11

WED

11/18

Introduce Integers – modeling addition on a number line Word Wall Wednesday

Rational Number

Introduce another representation of integer operations – the number line P E57 / E59 simple adding integer practice
THU

11/19

Module 2 Lesson 1

Opposite Quantities Combine to Make Zero

This Student Thought Thursday

Jessica made the addition model below of the expression (−5)+(−2)+3.

Play the integer game using a representation of choice Write an equation to model the sum of the situation below.

A hydrogen atom has a zero charge because it has one negatively charged electron and one positively chargedproton.

FRI

11/20

Learning New Technology Learning New Technology Learning New Technology Learning New Technology

.

Day Objectives Task Warm Up Guiding Questions /

Additional Info

Wrap Up/ Exit Ticket
MON

11/9

7.RP.1 I can compare unit rates.
7.RP.2d I can create a graph of a real-world proportional situation.7.RP.2d I can explain the meaning of the coordinates on a proportional graph and connect it to unit rate.7.RP.2d I can identify and use the constant of proportionality.7.RP.2b I can determine the unit rate of a proportional relationship from a table, graph, equation, and diagram.7.RP.2c I can represent a proportional situation with an equation y = mx.7.RP.2c I can analyze a proportional equation and explain what each value means.7.RP.3 I can use proportional relationships to solve multi-step ratio problems.
7.RP.3 I can use proportional relationships to solve multi-step increase or decrease percent problems.7.G.A.1Solve problems involving scale drawings of geometric figures, including computing actual lengths and areas from a scale drawing and reproducing a scale drawing at a different scale.
Lesson 17

The Unit Rate as the Scale Factor

HW Due Wednesday

Mixed Review Monday

Multiplying Mixed Numbers

Students begin using scale factor to sketch scale drawings into notebooks and label with appropriate measurements HW Lesson 17 Problem Set Due Wednesday
TUES

11/10

STAR Testing Type 1 Tuesday Identify and Explain THREE reasons to give your very best effort on today’s STAR Test? This assessment will be used as an overview for the teacher to gain understanding about each student’s individual level of learning.  This assessment will also be used to determine which students may require tier 2 or  tier 3 interventions. None
WED

11/11

Lesson 18 Computing Actual Lengths from a Scale Drawing Word Wall Wednesday

Scale drawing

Students use given scale to identify missing length, width, radius, diameter, etc. HW Lesson 18/19 Problem Set Due Friday
THU

11/12

1-2-3 Half Day

Lesson 19 Computing Actual Areas from a Scale Drawing This Student Thought Thursday

Nellie thought that since the google earth image below has a scale of 1 in to 100 ft, that the football field would be 100 times bigger in real life than it is on the picture.

Students use given scale to identify missing length, width, radius, diameter, etc, and calculate area given those measurements.
FRI

11/13

Unit Conversions Unit Conversions Real life scenarios often require the ability to combine the concept of scale factor with measurement conversions (cm to meters, etc).  Students will utilize proportions within this context to do so.

.

Day Objectives Task Warm Up Guiding Questions /

Additional Info

Wrap Up/ Exit Ticket
MON

11/2

7.RP.1 I can compare unit rates.

7.RP.2d I can create a graph of a real-world proportional situation.

7.RP.2d I can explain the meaning of the coordinates on a proportional graph and connect it to unit rate.

7.RP.2d I can identify and use the constant of proportionality.

7.RP.2b I can determine the unit rate of a proportional relationship from a table, graph, equation, and diagram.

7.RP.2c I can represent a proportional situation with an equation y = mx.

7.RP.2c I can analyze a proportional equation and explain what each value means.

7.RP.3 I can use proportional relationships to solve multi-step ratio problems.

7.RP.3 I can use proportional relationships to solve multi-step increase or decrease percent problems.

No Students No Students No Students No Students
TUES

11/3

No Students No Students No Students No Students
WED

11/4

Review for CFA  – If not finished during class, it’s homework due the next day T2W Similar v Not – Which triangle(s) resulted in a similar figure? Which did not?  What is the evidence? 3 testable topics

Markups/Markdowns (Lesson 14)

Reading Graphs of Fractional Unit Rates (Lesson 15)

Similarity (Lesson 16)

Review due Thursday
THU

11/5

CFA No Warm Up, to allow time for CFA Proving Similarity is necessary to support the upcoming objectives relating to scaling up and scaling down in geometric context Submit CFA
FRI

11/6

No Students –

Half Day 4/5/6 Hours

No Students –

Half Day 4/5/6 Hours

No Students –

Half Day 4/5/6 Hours

No Students –

Half Day 4/5/6 Hours

.

Day Objectives Task Warm Up Guiding Questions /

Additional Info

Wrap Up/ Exit Ticket
MON

10/26

7.RP.1 I can compare unit rates. 7.RP.2d I can create a graph of a real-world proportional situation.

7.RP.2d I can explain the meaning of the coordinates on a proportional graph and connect it to unit rate.

7.RP.2d I can identify and use the constant of proportionality.

7.RP.2b I can determine the unit rate of a proportional relationship from a table, graph, equation, and diagram.

7.RP.2c I can represent a proportional situation with an equation y = mx.

7.RP.2c I can analyze a proportional equation and explain what each value means.

7.RP.3 I can use proportional relationships to solve multi-step ratio problems. 7.RP.3 I can use proportional relationships to solve multi-step increase or decrease percent problems.

Presentation by Officer Hamilton Mixed Review Monday

Do’s and don’ts for guest speakers

Acceptable Use and Safety with Surface Pro 3s None
TUES

10/27

Mod 1 Lesson 15 Proportional Relationships Involving Fractions

Homework Due Thursday

Type __ Tuesday

IDENTIFY and ELABORATE x2: In what situations will you find unit rates that are not perfect whole numbers (i.e. When will the unit rates be fractional?)

Strategies for developing tables and graphs, and understanding unit rates from a graph. Use points on a graph to identify a unit rate, and pick the point on the graph that confirms this value.

Homework Lesson 15 Summary Due Thursday

WED

10/28

Morris Scaleyton –

How to Scale Figures to create Similar Figures

Word Wall Wednesday

Scale Factor

Understanding the meaning of similarity in plane figures T1W Similar v Not – Which directions resulted in a similar figure? Which did not?  What does this lead you to believe about similar figures?
THU

10/29

Review Similar/ Congruent

Lesson 16 Relating Scale Drawing to Ratios and Rates

This Student Thought Thursday

A bicycle shop advertised a $327mountain bike priced at a 1/3 discount.   Jenna asked her mom to buy the bike since it would only cost

Scaling up and scaling down Create a scale drawing, identify if the picture is a reduction or an enlargement, and identify the scale factor (the constant of proportionality).
FRI

10/30

Mod 1 Lesson 17

The Unit Rate as the Scale Factor

Fluency Friday The Connection: Finding the scale factor by finding unit rate A rectangular pool in your friend’s yard is 150 ft. × 400 ft. Create a scale drawing with a scale factor of 1/600. Use a table or an equation to show how you computed the scale drawing lengths.

.

.

Day Objectives Task Warm Up Guiding Questions /

Additional Info

Wrap Up/ Exit Ticket
MON

10/19

7.RP.1 I can compare unit rates. 7.RP.2d I can create a graph of a real-world proportional situation.

7.RP.2d I can explain the meaning of the coordinates on a proportional graph and connect it to unit rate.

7.RP.2d I can identify and use the constant of proportionality.

7.RP.2b I can determine the unit rate of a proportional relationship from a table, graph, equation, and diagram.

7.RP.2c I can represent a proportional situation with an equation y = mx.

7.RP.2c I can analyze a proportional equation and explain what each value means.

7.RP.3 I can use proportional relationships to solve multi-step ratio problems. 7.RP.3 I can use proportional relationships to solve multi-step increase or decrease percent problems.

No Students No Students No Students No Students
TUES

10/20

No Students No Students No Students No Students
WED

10/21

Review of Lesson 12 &13  Finding Equivalent Ratios Given a Quantity Numeracy Practice

Comparing Two Proportional Relationships

Continued Emphasis on Constant of Proportionality, Independent, and Dependent Variables – more complicated with mixed numbers. No Homework today –

The table below shows the combination of a dry prepackaged mix and water to make concrete.   The mix says for every 1 gallon of water stir 60 pounds of dry mix. We know that 1 gallon of water is equal to 8 pounds of water. Using the information provided in the table, complete the remaining parts of the table.

THU

10/22

Tape Diagrams for Markups and Markdowns Powerpoint

Start Mod 1 Lesson 14

Multi-Step Ratio Problems

Homework Lesson Summary 14

Numeracy Practice

Comparing Two Proportional Relationships

Diagramming can be helpful to students (tape diagrams) so this is a great week to review those. Homework Lesson Summary 14 due Monday
FRI

10/23

Finish Mod 1 Lesson 14 Fluency Friday Exit Ticket

1. A bicycle shop advertised all mountain bikes priced at a 1 3 discount. a. What is the amount of the discount if the bicycle originally costs $327?

b. What is the discount price of the bicycle?

c. Explain how you found your solution to part b.

2. A hand-held digital music player was marked down by 1 4 of the original price. a. If the sales price is $128.00, what is the original price?

b. If the item was marked up by 1 2 before it was placed on the sales floor, what was the price that the store paid for the digital player?

c. What is the difference between the discount price and the price that the store paid for the digital player?

.

Day Objectives Task Warm Up Guiding Questions /

Additional Info

Wrap Up/ Exit Ticket
MON

10/12

7.RP.1 I can compute unit rates of ratios with the same and different measures of units. 7.RP.1 I can explain the meaning and purpose of a unit rate. 7.RP.1 I can compare unit rates.

7.RP.2a I can determine when two ratios are proportional.

7.RP.2a I can explain numbers in a table and decide whether or not it represents a proportional relationship. 7.RP.2a I can justify if a situation does or does not represent a proportional relationship.

7.RP.2d I can create a graph of a real-world proportional situation.

7.RP.2d I can explain the meaning of the coordinates on a proportional graph and connect it to unit rate.

7.RP.2d I can identify and use the constant of proportionality.

7.RP.2b I can determine the unit rate of a proportional relationship from a table, graph, equation, and diagram.

7.RP.2c I can represent a proportional situation with an equation y = mx.

7.RP.2c I can analyze a proportional equation and explain what each value means.

Begin Part C Mod 1 Lesson 11

Ratios of Fractions and their Unit Rates

Homework Lesson 11 Summary

Mixed Review Monday

Multiplying and Dividing Fractions practice problems w/ units of measure

Students are increasing difficulty of proportional situations as now they are dealing with fractional proportions. Homework  Due Wednesday
TUES

10/13

 Mod 1 Lesson 12

Ratios of Fractions and their Unit Rates

Type 1 Tuesday

3-2-1 Warm up

Continue working on “Math in 4 Ways” which means that any proportional situation can be represented 4 ways –using a story, a table, a graph, and an equation. Exit Ticket – #3-4
WED

10/14

Start Mod 1 Lesson 13

Finding Equivalent Ratios Given the Total Quantity

Word Wall Wednesday

Complex Fraction

Continued Emphasis on Constant of Proportionality, Independent, and Dependent Variables – more complicated with mixed numbers.
THU

10/15

Finish Mod 1 Lesson 13

Finding Equivalent Ratios Given the Total Quantity

Homework Lesson 13 Summary

This Student Thought Thursday Which car can travel further on 1 gallon of gas? Blue Car: travels 1825 miles using 0.8 gallons of gas

Red Car: travels 1725 miles using 0.75 gallons of gas

Kara thinks it’s the red car.

The next step in our module will be to calculate markups and markdowns. Diagramming can be helpful to students (tape diagrams) so this is a great week to review those. Homework Due Monday

Which is the better buy? Show your work and explain your reasoning.

31/3 lb. of turkey for $10.50 21/2 lb. of turkey for $6.25

SUB

FRI

10/16

SUB

Multiplying and Dividing Fractions Practice

C-61 + C-68

SUB

Fluency Friday –

SUB SUB

Submit Practice

.

Day Objectives Task Warm Up Guiding Questions /

Additional Info

Wrap Up/ Exit Ticket
MON

10/5

7.RP.1 I can compute unit rates of ratios with the same and different measures of units. 7.RP.1 I can explain the meaning and purpose of a unit rate. 7.RP.1 I can compare unit rates.

7.RP.2a I can determine when two ratios are proportional.

7.RP.2a I can explain numbers in a table and decide whether or not it represents a proportional relationship. 7.RP.2a I can justify if a situation does or does not represent a proportional relationship.

7.RP.2d I can create a graph of a real-world proportional situation.

7.RP.2d I can explain the meaning of the coordinates on a proportional graph and connect it to unit rate.

7.RP.2d I can identify and use the constant of proportionality.

7.RP.2b I can determine the unit rate of a proportional relationship from a table, graph, equation, and diagram.

7.RP.2c I can represent a proportional situation with an equation y = mx.

7.RP.2c I can analyze a proportional equation and explain what each value means.

Toothpick Patterning Performance Task

Update Concept Map

Begin Mod 1 Lesson 10

Identifying Proportional vs. Non-Proportional Relationships in Tables

HOMEWORK Lesson 10 Summary

Mixed Review Monday

Math in 4 ways – representing a proportional recipe by table, graph, equation and story.

Students are continuing to struggle with writing equations for proportional situations.  Specifically, identifying the independent and dependent variables.  This will help students to identify the constant of proportionality as well as scaffold the learning.

http://mathforum.org/library/

drmath/view/61593.html

Homework  Due Wednesday

Study for Mid-Module Assessment on Wednesday

TUES

10/6

Finish Mod 1 Lesson 10

Identifying Proportional vs. Non-Proportional Relationships in Tables

Type 1 Tuesday

3-2-1 Warm up

Continue working on “Math in 4 Ways” which means that any proportional situation can be represented 4 ways –using a story, a table, a graph, and an equation. Great Rapids White Water Rafting Company rents rafts for $125 per hour. Explain why the point (0,0) and (1,125) are on the graph of the relationship, and what these points mean in the context of the problem.
WED

10/7

Vocabulary Summary and Study Session Word Wall Wednesday

Constant of Proportionality

Focus on Constant of Proportionality, Independent, and Dependent Variables.

https://nces.ed.gov/nceskids/

help/user_guide/graph/variables.asp

http://www.icoachmath.com/

math_dictionary/Independent_Variable.html

THU

10/8

Mid-Module Assessment This Student Thought Thursday

The cost of renting a snowmobile is $37.50 for 5 hours. The constant of proportionality is 37.50, so the equation I would use is y=37.50x.

None – Review  Mid-Module Assessment
FRI

10/9

Fraction Operations Review – Multiplying and Dividing Fractions Numeracy Friday – Proportional Relationship of the day Scaffolding into Part C of Module 1 Submit Practice

.

Day Objectives Task Warm Up Guiding Questions /

Additional Info

Wrap Up/ Exit Ticket
MON

9/28

7.RP.1 I can compute unit rates of ratios with the same and different measures of units. 7.RP.1 I can explain the meaning and purpose of a unit rate. 7.RP.1 I can compare unit rates.

7.RP.2a I can determine when two ratios are proportional.

7.RP.2a I can explain numbers in a table and decide whether or not it represents a proportional relationship. 7.RP.2a I can justify if a situation does or does not represent a proportional relationship.

7.RP.2d I can create a graph of a real-world proportional situation.

7.RP.2d I can explain the meaning of the coordinates on a proportional graph and connect it to unit rate.

7.RP.2d I can identify and use the constant of proportionality.

7.RP.2b I can determine the unit rate of a proportional relationship from a table, graph, equation, and diagram.

7.RP.2c I can represent a proportional situation with an equation y = mx.

7.RP.2c I can analyze a proportional equation and explain what each value means.

Mod 1 Lesson 7

Unit Rates as the Constant of Proportionality

HOMEWORK:

Lesson 7 Summary

Mixed Review Monday

“Wow that was amazing! That means the dog went about 5 meters in 1 second!” Is your classmate correct, and how do you know?

Tillman Video

http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=tCKstDXMslQ

Homework Due Wednesday
TUES

9/29

Mod 1 Lesson 8

Representing Proportional Relationships with Equations

Type 1 Tuesday

What I know about proportions:

What strategies have been helpful:

Example of a helpful strategy:

Reflect on the topic:

Continue working on “Math in 4 Ways” which means that any proportional situation can be represented 4 ways –using a story, a table, a graph, and an equation. Determine John’s  and Amber’s constant of proportionality and write an equation for each.
WED

9/30

Scaffolding into Mod 1 Lesson 9 w/ a  Matching Activity

Proportional Relationships with Equations

HOMEWORK: Practice Graphing and Writing Equations for Proportional Situations

Word Wall Wednesday

proportion

Beginning to determine whether or not a scaled up ratio is actually proportional to the initial comparison.  Lesson 8 Exit Ticket

(#3-4)

Homework Due Friday

THU

10/1

Mod 1 Lesson 9 Representing Proportional Relationships with Equations This Student Thought Thursday

Ms. Albero made juice to serve along with the pizza at the Student Government party. The directions said to mix 2 scoops of powdered drink mix with a half gallon of water to make each pitcher of juice. One of Ms. Albero’s students said she will mix 8 scoops with 2 gallons of water to make 4 pitchers. Use a table and graph to show whether or not the student is correct.

Continuing to determine whether or not a scaled up ratio is actually proportional to the initial comparison. Homework Due Friday
FRI

10/2

Continue Lesson 9 Fluency Friday Friday practice will provide time to do re-teaching (student intervention centers) for students who need it.  None

.

Day Objectives Task Warm Up Guiding Questions /

Additional Info

Wrap Up/ Exit Ticket
MON

9/21

7.RP.1 I can compute unit rates of ratios with the same and different measures of units.
7.RP.1 I can explain the meaning and purpose of a unit rate.
7.RP.1 I can compare unit rates.7.RP.1 I can scale up and scale down ratios.7.RP.2a I can determine when two ratios are proportional.7.RP.2a I can explain numbers in a table and decide whether or not it represents a proportional relationship.
7.RP.2a I can justify if a situation does or does not represent a proportional relationship.7.RP.2d I can create a graph of a real-world proportional situation.7.RP.2d I can explain the meaning of the coordinates on a proportional graph and connect it to unit rate.
No Students No Students No Students No Students
TUES

9/22

No Students No Students No Students No Students
WED

9/23

Mod 1 Lesson 5 Identifying Proportional and Non-Proportional Relationships using Graphs

HOMEWORK: Lesson 5 Summary: Due Friday

“Fluency” Wednesday Identify two+ important characteristics of a graph that indicate whether or not the graph represents a proportional relationship. No exit ticket – allow students to begin the homework assignment and ask questions
THU

9/24

Mod 1 Lesson 6

Identifying Proportional and Non-Proportional Relationships using Graphs

Number Sense Thursday – Rate of the Day Produce a set of posters that display the first three parts “math in 4 ways” – Math in 4 ways means that any proportional situation can be represented 4 ways –using a story, a table, a graph, and an equation. Given a problem, students use the “math in 4 ways” prompt to determine whether or not the situation is proportional
FRI

9/25

QUIZ over Module 1 – Lesson 1-5

Pizzazz Practice Sheet

Homework if not finished,  Due Monday

 

Number Sense Friday –

Proportional Relationship of the Day

Friday quiz will be utilized to identify the need for reteaching. No exit ticket – quiz will be used for an assessment grade
Day Objectives Task Warm Up Guiding Questions /

Additional Info

Wrap Up/ Exit Ticket
MON

9/14

7.RP.1 I can compute unit rates of ratios with the same and different measures of units.
7.RP.1 I can explain the meaning and purpose of a unit rate.
7.RP.1 I can compare unit rates.7.RP.1 I can scale up and scale down ratios.7.RP.2a I can determine when two ratios are proportional.7.RP.2a I can explain numbers in a table and decide whether or not it represents a proportional relationship.
7.RP.2a I can justify if a situation does or does not represent a proportional relationship.
Mod 1 Lesson 1 Part B

Ratios and Unit Rates

HOMEWORK: Lesson 1 Summary: Due Wednesday

Mixed Review Monday

Simplify these ratios:

10:2   8:12    6:15

Find the unit rates:

It costs $3.99 for 6 bottles of Mt. Dew.

It took 56 minutes to run 7 miles.

After seeing this video, another dog owner trained his dog, Lightning, to try to break Tillman’s skateboarding record. Lightning’s fastest recorded time was on a 75-meter stretch where it took him 15.5 seconds. Based on this data, did Lightning break Tillman’s record for fastest dog on a skateboard? Explain how you know.
TUES

9/15

Mod 1 Lesson 2

Proportional Relationships

Type 1 Tuesday

List three examples of rates and explain the context in the real world

Beginning to scale up and scale down using frozen yogurt (price per ounce) as an example. Ms. Albero decided to make juice to serve along with the pizza at the Student Government party. The directions said to mix 2 scoops of powdered drink mix with a half gallon of water to make each pitcher of juice. One of Ms. Albero’s students said she will mix 8 scoops with 2 gallons of water to make 4 pitchers. How can you use the concept of proportional relationships to decide whether the student is correct?
WED

9/16

Mod 1 Lesson 3

Identifying Proportional vs. Non-Proportional Relationships in Tables

Ratios and Unit Rates

HOMEWORK: Lesson 3 Summary: Due Friday

Word Wall Wednesday

Equivalent ratio

Beginning to determine whether or not a scaled up ratio is actually proportional to the initial comparison. Refer to table in Lesson 3:

1. Is the price proportional to the number of roses? How do you know?

2. Find the cost of purchasing 30 roses.

THU

9/17

Mod 1 Lesson 4

Identifying Proportional vs. Non-Proportional Relationships in Tables

This Student Thought Thursday

I should only spend $1.49 for a bottle of Faygo.  $24.99 for a 24 pack is way more expensive.

Continuing to determine whether or not a scaled up ratio is actually proportional to the initial comparison. Complete the table from Lesson 4.

If Gabby wants to make a regular octagon with a side length of 20 inches using wire, how much wire does she need? Justify your reasoning with an explanation of whether perimeter is proportional to the side length.

FRI

9/18

Pizzazz Practice Sheet

Homework if not finished,  Due Monday

Fluency Friday Friday practice will provide time to do re-teaching (student intervention centers) for students who need it. No exit ticket
Day Objectives Task Warm Up Guiding Questions /

Additional Info

Wrap Up/ Exit Ticket
MON

9/7

7.RP.1 I can compute unit rates of ratios with the same and different measures of units.
7.RP.1 I can explain the meaning and purpose of a unit rate.
7.RP.1 I can compare unit rates.
No School No School No School No School
TUES

9/8

Common Growth Assessment Pre Test Type2 Tuesday

Today you will be given your pre-test.  I will use the pretest to figure out what you’re already good at, and what you need help at.  Make a prediction about how you think you will do.

This pretest will be used to assess current preconceptions for each student, as well as demonstrate student growth. No Exit Ticket – Assessment will be graded
WED

9/9

STAR Math Assessment Word Wall Wednesday

No Warm Up, move to computer lab for the day

This assessment will be used as an overview for the teacher to gain understanding about each student’s individual level of learning.  This assessment will also be used to determine which students may require tier 2 or  tier 3 interventions. No Exit Ticket – Teacher will review student reports
THU

9/10

Unit Overview This Student Thought Thursday  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4uejibRYTi0

If a basketball player’s ratio of shots made to shots missed in the first quarter is 6:2, that means that by the end of the game they’ll have a ratio of 12:4.

Students will view two brief video clips which introduce them to a real life “proportional” situation.  This will help them ask the essential and supporting questions for the unit, and teacher will support the questioning process. No Exit Ticket – if there is time left at the end of the hour, students can begin vocabulary study
FRI

9/11

Module 1 Lesson 1

Ratios as Relationships that Measure Rate

Fluency Friday Students will understand that a ratio is a comparison of two quantities and calculate a unit rate based on the given ratio.

Tillman the English Bulldog

http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=tCKstDXMslQ

Watch the video clip of Tillman the English bulldog, the Guinness World Record holder for Fastest Dog on a Skateboard.

1. At the conclusion of the video, your classmate takes out his or her calculator and says, “Wow that was amazing! That means the dog went about 5 meters in 1 second!” Is your classmate correct, and how do you know?

Sequence of Grade 7 Modules Aligned with the Standards
Module 1: Ratios and Proportional Relationships
Module 2: Rational Numbers
Module 3: Expressions and Equations
Module 4: Percent and Proportional Relationships
Module 5: Statistics and Probability
Module 6: Geometry
Summary of Year
Seventh grade mathematics is about (1) developing understanding of and applying proportional relationships; (2) developing understanding of operations with rational numbers and working with expressions and linear equations; (3) solving problems involving scale drawings and informal geometric constructions, and working with two- and three-dimensional shapes to solve problems involving area, surface area, and volume; and (4) drawing inferences about populations based on samples.
Key Areas of Focus for Grade 7: Ratios and proportional reasoning; arithmetic of rational numbers

Rationale for Module Sequence in Grade 7
In Module 1, students build on their Grade 6 experiences with ratios, unit rates, and fraction division to analyze proportional relationships. They decide whether two quantities are in a proportional relationship, identify constants of proportionality, and represent the relationship by equations. These skills are then applied to real-world problems including scale drawings.
Students continue to build an understanding of the number line in Module 2 from their work in Grade 6. They learn to add, subtract, multiply, and divide rational numbers. Module 2 includes rational numbers as they appear in expressions and equations—work that is continued in Module 3.

Module 3 consolidates and expands students’ previous work with generating equivalent expressions and solving equations. Students solve real-life and mathematical problems using numerical and algebraic expressions and equations. Their work with expressions and equations is applied to finding unknown angles and problems involving area, volume, and surface area.
Module 4 parallels Module 1’s coverage of ratio and proportion, but this time with a concentration on percent. Problems in this module include simple interest, tax, markups and markdowns, gratuities and commissions, fees, percent increase and decrease, and percent error. Additionally, this module includes percent problems about populations, which prepare students for probability models about populations covered in the next module.
In Module 5, students learn to draw inferences about populations based on random samples. Through the study of chance processes, students learn to develop, use and evaluate probability models.
The year concludes with students drawing and constructing geometrical figures in Module 6. They also revisit unknown angle, area, volume, and surface area problems, which now include problems involving percentages of areas or volumes.

Advertisements